.
ZThemes

yellowxperil:

portmanteaurian:

it blows my mind how white people can go somewhere absolutely jam packed with brown people and be like “oh i found this fantastic place! absolutely no one knows about it, it’s amazing!”

i’m talking about dance clubs but also about, like, north america

RIGHT? fuckin, “lemme take you to this little tucked away asian restaurant that no one knows about”

BRO. YOU. WH- THIS RESTAURANT IS FILLED WITH ASIAN FAMILIES. HI

Artist: Pink Floyd
Track Name: "Wish You Were Here"
Played: 17309 times

(Source: hhotaru)

anartisticanomaly:

phantomcat94:

meefling:

You Aren’t Boring I Just Suck At Conversations I’m Sorry: a novel by me

I’m Not Ignoring You I Just Don’t Know What To Say: a sequel by me

I Feel Like I have Nothing Interesting To Say So I Don’t Say Anything At All And I’m Really Sorry Don’t Stop Talking To Me: the trilogy.

(Source: amasianfish)

wired:


Using clever algorithm processing, the app makes it easy to use your phone to create tracking shots and fast, time-lapse videos that look as if they’re shot by Scorsese or Michael Mann. What was once only possible with a Steadicam or a $15,000 tracking rig is now possible on your iPhone, for free. 

[MORE: Hyperlapse, Instagram’s New App, Is Like a $15,000 Video Setup in Your Hand]

wired:

Using clever algorithm processing, the app makes it easy to use your phone to create tracking shots and fast, time-lapse videos that look as if they’re shot by Scorsese or Michael Mann. What was once only possible with a Steadicam or a $15,000 tracking rig is now possible on your iPhone, for free. 

[MORE: Hyperlapse, Instagram’s New App, Is Like a $15,000 Video Setup in Your Hand]

(Source: Wired)

princeburrito:

date people you see yourself walking down Main Street of Disneyland with. 

[F]or the first several years the SAT was offered, males scored higher than females on the Math section but females achieved higher scores on the Verbal section. ETS policy-makers determined that the Verbal test needed to be “balanced” more in favor of males, and added questions pertaining to politics, business and sports to the Verbal portion. Since that time, males have outscored females on both the Math and Verbal sections. Dwyer notes that no similar effort has been made to “balance” the Math section, and concludes that, “It could be done, but it has not been, and I believe that probably an unconscious form of sexism underlies this pattern. When females show the superior performance, ‘balancing’ is required; when males show the superior performance, no adjustments are necessary.”

“Gender Bias in College Admissions Tests”, FairTest.org

And then people urge me everything is fine, of course it is, when you’re ignoring statistics that is.

(via cwnl)

Fun fact: SAT tests predict college performance pretty well for men, but they strongly underpredict college performance for women. http://spp.sagepub.com/content/early/2012/12/20/1948550612469038.abstract

HMMMM

(via brute-reason)

I think I’ve reblogged this before, but that study needs to be shared.

(via conjecturesandconversations)

(Source: aaabbbbbbiiieee)

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

curlicuecal:

Games with English: insert the word “only” anywhere into the above sentence and consider how the placement changes meaning.

Anonymous:
what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting

fishingboatproceeds:

I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.

nerdnuggets:

jelliclephantomfaces:

chandraleeschwartz:

six-months-from-never:

*sees broom*

*picks up broom*

"TELL THEM HOW I AM DEFYYYYYYYYYING GRAAAAAVITTYYYY"

*starts sweeping broom sadly*

"There is a castle on a cloud…"

*holds broom horizontally*

"Never need a reason, never need a rhyme. Up on the roof top step in time!"

*sweeps broom angrily*

"IT’S A HARD KNOCK LIFE!"

dragonheartedrabbit:

"Waste of good ammo. It’s my privilege to buy you a replacement box."

"All self-respecting whites have a moral responsibility to support our growing number of martyrs to the failed experiment called diversity."

"I thank all Police, you are the ‘Thin Blue Line’ protecting normal Americans from aggressive and entitled primitive savages. America is surely at the tipping point."

Just a few quotes (in case it’s hard to read) from that collection of donation messages for Darren Wilson.

Does anyone else want to say it’s not about race?

Anonymous:
I'm sorry, you said meat is bad. This isn't 100% true. Studies show that when real meat (meaning meat that hasn't been through some unnatural process, with the extreme being McDonalds) is eaten in the correct proportions then it can be beneficial to our health. Now, that essentially means moderation, and picking the right meats. But truthfully, a general good rule in life is everything in moderation. I just think it's unfair and incorrect to say meat is bad period.

edwardspoonhands:

You’re right, meat isn’t necessarily bad for your health (though, to be clear, there’s no data supporting the idea that McDonald’s meat is better or worse than other meat…except that it’s easier to eat a lot of it very quickly, and there’s a ton of salt…and you generally also consume it with fried potatoes and sugar water.)

But yes, there’s nothing wrong with meat in moderation…though diets high in animal protein have been found to be linked with cancer, heart disease, and premature death in humans.

But, on the whole, whether I live to be 73 or 78 is not so much of a concern to me as the overall impact I have on the world during those years. No one can deny that meat is horrible for the environment. Giving up meat would probably reduce your carbon footprint by more than giving up driving

40% of grain produced in America is fed to livestock animals. That’s enough to feed 800 million people. 30% of the world’s total ice-free land is used to grow crops to fead to livestock. 30% OF THE WHOLE WORLD! Only 10% is used to grow human food crops.

There are ways to raise animals with less significant or even beneficial environmental impact…but we do not raise animals that way. 

I’m not even touching on the cruelty, here. Let’s just worry about the Earth and not individuals for a moment…if we do that, meat is /clearly bad/ and we should all eat less (if we can), which I try very hard to do.